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25 Apr 2021 — Like I Was

 

Can you replace "like" with "as" in both of these sentences?

 

Man playing with his dog, Jackson.

Jackson was injured in a car accident like I was, but we both recovered. Afterwards, it was like nothing had happened to us.

Jackson is the dog's name.

 

Choose one or more options to fix the sentence.
 

1.

[S1] Jackson was injured in a car accident like I was , but we both recovered. [S2] Afterwards, it was like nothing had happened to us.

2.

[S1] Jackson was injured in a car accident as I was, but we both recovered. [S2] Afterwards, it was as nothing had happened to us

3.

.

[S1] Jackson was injured in a car accident, as was I, but we both recovered. [S2] Afterwards, it was as if nothing had happened to us.

 

GLOSSARY

  • as (preposition) – comparative, in a similar manner. *He stays up late as me. (not used) but He stays up as late as me. (considered informal by some)
  • as (connective preposition / conjunction) – comparative, in a similar manner. He stays up late as I do. / He stays up late as do I. (and so do I.)
  • conjunction — In traditional grammar, "conjunction" is another word for a "connector" (a word that joins a dependent to the main clause). However in linguistics (and mathematics), this term is reserved for the logic function: A + B "both" or "and".  See AND, BUT, OR.
  • like (preposition) – comparative, in a similar manner. He stays up late like me.
  • like (connective preposition / conjunction) – comparative, in a similar manner. He stays up late like I do. (This is considered informal by some.)

SOURCES

  • Fowler's Modern English Usage. Edited by R. W. Burchfield and H. W. Fowler, revised 3rd ed., Oxford UP, 2004.
  • Garner's Modern American Usage. by Bryan A. Garner, 3rd ed., Oxford UP, 2009.
  • Huddleston, Rodney D., and Geoffrey K. Pullum. The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language. Cambridge UP, 2002.
  • McWhorter, John. "The Evolution of 'Like'." The Atlantic, 25 Nov 2016, theatlantic.com/entertainment/archive/2016/11/the-evolution-of-like/507614.
  • Merriam-Webster's Dictionary of English Usage. Reprint ed., Merriam-Webster, 1994.
  • Swan, Michael. Practical English Usage. 3rd ed., Oxford UP, 2005.

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