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Pop Question -

14 Mar 2021 — Her and I's

 

The contestants on dating shows seem to have trouble forming possessives (genitives) for double-pronoun subjects. How would you fix this?

Bachelor gives rose to contestant on show

Her and I's relationship is getting stronger every time we meet.

 

Choose one option to fix the sentence.
 

1.

Her and I's relationship is getting stronger every time we meet.

2.

Me and her relationship is getting stronger every time we meet.

3.

I and her relationship is getting stronger every time we meet.

4.

My and her relationship is getting stronger every time we meet.

5.

She and my relationship is getting stronger every time we meet.

6.

My relationship with her is getting stronger every time we meet.

7.

My relationship and hers is getting stronger every time we meet.

 

GLOSSARY

  • determiner – a determiner functions to determine or limit the meaning of a noun phrase in a particular context, and it includes categories such as articles (the, a), demonstratives (this, that), quantifiers (some, few), possessive pronouns (my, our), and numbers (one, five). See Determiners.
  • genitive noun – also called a possessive, expresses a relationship between two nouns, for example, a trait (Jack's hair), ownership (Jack's dog), family relationship (Jack's dad), substance (the atmosphere's nitrogen), source (the sea's fish), origin (Greece's economy), reference (the Senate's Intelligence Committee), description (children's book), and more. See Genitive Noun Forms.
  • genitive pronoun – (my, our, his, her, their, your)  is a determiner before a noun  that expresses a relationship: ownership (my dog), a natural trait (his tail), a family relationship (his mom), origin (his city), performer of an action (his arrival), and more. See Possessive Determiner vs. Possessive Pronoun.
  • pronoun – expresses a person or thing without specifying the name of the person or thing.  A pronoun is commonly used on second mention of a noun and functions  as a shortened reference to the noun. See Pronouns.

 SOURCE

  • Huddleston, Rodney D., and Geoffrey K. Pullum. "Coordination of Genitives." The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language. Cambridge UP, 2002. 15 §3.4b.

IMAGE   

  • Bachelor awarding rose to contestant. Screen capture. ABC (TV). 8 Mar. 2021.