Grammar-QuizzesModifiers to NounsAdjective Summary › Adjective + Prep Phrase

Adjective + Prepositional Phrase

Pair adjectives with prepositions

Justin
 

Adjectives that Specify one or more Prepositions

ADJ + PREP

Some adjectives are followed by particular prepositions.  The preposition does not "belong" to the adjective, rather the adjective specifies (is customarily followed by) one particular preposition and phrase.

Justin is responsible for the project. (in charge)

Justin is responsible to his boss. (working for)

 

The judge found him (to be) guilty of murder. (responsible)

Justin feels guilty about not calling home. (regretful)

Justin is similar to me.

Justin is good at math. (has skills)

Justin is good about helping. (regarding)

Justin is good with children. (inter-personal skills)

A calculator is good for adding. (able to do)

Justin is good for it.  (certain to repay)

This ticket is good for one ride.  (valid, lasting)

Good for you!  (expression approval)

ADJ + PP + PP

Occasionally, an adjective is followed by more than one specified preposition within a clause. Either prepositional phrase could be the sole (only) complement.                                                  

Justin is responsible to his boss for the project.

Justin was apologetic to his boss for not being on time.

Justin is thankful to co-workers for being supportive.

One co-worker was argumentative with his boss about how to do a job.

The co-work was upset with his boss for not exploring other ideas.

He was frank with Justin about what he thought. (honest, direct)

Justin is good at helping co-workers with math projects.

 

 

 

An adjective is said to be "complemented by a prepositional phrase". The preposition does not "belong to the adjective".

 

 

 

 

 

Adjective + Prep List

Complete the meaning with a specified preposition and phrase

 

 

Adjectives that Specifiy Prepositions

ABOUT / AT FOR / FROM OF ON / TO WITH

anxious about 
We are anxious about it.

appropriate for
Jeans are not appropriate for it.

afraid of 
The dog is afraid of you.

dependent on 
He is dependent on them.

comfortable with 
We are comfortable with him.

enthusiastic about 
She is enthusiastic about it.

famous for
She is famous for her art.

capable of
He is capable of doing it well.

kind to 
He was very kind to us.

content with 
We are content with

happy about 
She is happy about the news..

responsible for 
He is responsible for it.

fearful of 
He was fearful of his father.

nice to 
My mom is  nice to me.

good with 
Justin is good with people.

sad about
We are sad about your loss.

sorry for 
He is sorry for doing that.

fond of
She is very fond of him.

polite to
She is polite to them.

effective with 
He is effective with his words.

sorry about
He is sorry about something.

suitable for 
That is not suitable for kids.

guilty of 
She was guilty of the crime.

open to
She was open to his ideas.

ill with 
My mom is ill with a cold.

optimistic about
He is optimistic about it.

thankful for 
He is thankful for your help.

Independent of She is independent of her parents..

relevant to
The book was relevant to us.

patient with
She is patient with students.

angry at 
He's angry at his friend.

good for
A ticket is good for one game.

respectful of
He is respectful of his elders.

rude to
She was very rude to them.

popular with 
He is popular with friends.

bad at
He is bad at writing people.

different from 
This is different from that.

proud of
She is proud of her son.

responsible to
He is responsible to his boss.

reckless with 
He is reckless with his car.

good at 
Justin is good at math.

separate from 
Yours is separate from mine.

suspicious of
She is suspicious of them.

similar to
This is similar to that

skillful with 
He is skillful with a brush.

Prepositions may vary with dialectal usage.

The preposition does not "belong" to the adjective, rather the adjective specifies (is customarily followed by) one particular preposition, which adds information in the form of a prepositional phrase.  See Unspecified vs. Specified Preposition.

specify (V) – require an element (a particular element)

(Huddleston et al. 6 §3.1)

Other Lists: Verb + Prep (List) | Participle Modifier & Preposition (List) | Noun + Prep Phrase | Verb + Prep + Gerund (List)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Practice

Independence

Jason
 

Determine the preposition that goes with the adjective.

  1. Select the response from the list that best completes the sentence. 
  2. Compare your response to the feedback by clicking the "Check" button or the "Check 1-20" button at the bottom.

 

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non-profits — charity work

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