Grammar-QuizzesAdverbials › Stance Adverbs

Stance Adverbs

Express opinion, attitude or circumstance for a situation

X structure diagram
walking
Apparently, walking is good for you.
‹ diagram ›
► What is a stance adverb? ▼ Explanation of term

What is a stance adverb?

  • A stance adverb expresses opinion (perhaps, apparently, maybe), evaluation (sadly, unforunately, happily), or the particular circumstances under which the clause is being spoken or written (frankly, briefly, confidentially). The stance adverb is a loosely-related, add-on comment about the content of the entire clause.
  • A stance adverb often takes the -ly suffix and, because it is an additional comment about the content of the entire clause, the clause is set off by commas.  Apparently, walking is good for you.  Walking is good for you, apparently, Walking is, perhaps, the best exercise.

Stance Adverbs

Summary of Practices

 

 

Adverbs for Opinion : express truth or belief about a situation

Intermediate–Advanced ESL, Native Speakers

A climber

Possibly, he will reach the top. (uncertain)  

He might reach the top of the ice wall. (uncertain)

He apparently has super-human strength.  (inference)

He must have super-human strength. (inference)

He actually climbed it by himself.  (factual, widely accepted)

In my view, he's pretty amazing.

He apparently climbed it in world-record time.

Adv for Evaluation: express an attitude about a situation

Intermediate–Advanced ESL, Native Speakers

A climber 

Hopefully, he will reach the top. (evaluation adv.)
He set out hopefully to reach to the top. (manner adv.)

Adverbs for Speech-acts: express the conditions under which something is being said

Intermediate–Advanced ESL, Native Speakers

Frankly, it won't last 

Frankly, I don't think your plan will work. (speech-act related adverb)

He told me frankly about his problems. (adverb)

Confidentially, Ed is having some money problems.

He mentioned confidentially that he's having money problems.

Connective Adverbs: indicate a relationship between two situations  

Intermediate–Advanced ESL, Native Speakers

organic 

Buying organic fruit and vegetables is a better choice.  First, they are less contaminated by chemical pesticides.  Second, they are not genetically modified. Furthermore, they are allowed to mature or ripen fully.  Finally, they have a shorter "shelf life" so they are sold when fresh or best.  

Interjections: express a short emotional response

Intermediate–Advanced ESL

Uh! Can't make up his mind. 

Uh. Which one should I eat?.  (pause)

Wow!   This tastes good.  (surprise)

Oops. I dropped it. (embarrassment)

 

 

How vs What: emphasize opinion with an exclamation (!)

Beginning–Intermediate ESL

Jellyfish 

How beautiful! 

How beautiful a creature

How beautiful it is! 

How gracefully it swims! 

What a creatureremarkably beautiful or ugly

What a beautiful creature!

*What an awful creature stung me!

 

*not used

Discourse Markers: grab attention, hesitate, affirm, interject and more

Intermediate–Advanced ESL, Native Speakers

Giving a presentation 

So!   What you are saying is that we have to have everything ready by then.

So… what you are saying is that we have to have everything ready by then.

So, you are saying we have to have everything ready by Wednesday midnight.  (inf.)  I guess that…

So we need to get the testing, advertising and database in place.  (inf.) In summary