Run-on Sentences

Identify simple and coordinated sentences

football
 

 

Simple Sentences  (a clause)

SIMPLE

A simple sentence includes a subject and a predicate.  A predicate includes a verb and possibly an object + complement.  See Subject / Predicate.

Jack invited friends over.   

 They watched a soccer game.

They jeered all the bad plays.  

Jack went to the store for more drinks.

They drank all the beer in his fridge.

SIMPLE WITH DOUBLE ELEMENTS

The conjunction and can  join similar elements within a sentence: subjects, verbs, objects, prepositional phrases, etc. 

Jack and I invited friends over.  (double subject)

Jack invited and welcomed friends over for the game. (double verb)

Jack invited friends and ordered pizza for the game. (double predicate)

Jack ordered pizza and sandwiches for the game.  (double object)

Jack ordered pizza and sandwiches for the game and for that evening. (double prepositional phrases) 

 

fridge – refrigerator;
jeer – express disapproval

Related pages: Clauses (basic examples) and FANBOYS (coordinating conjunctions)

 

 

 

 

 

 

"Compound Sentences"

Coordinated Clauses

 

 

 

Compound Sentences / Coordinated Clauses

COORDINATING CONJUNCTION

Two independent clauses with different subjects and closely related central ideas may be joined with a coordinating conjunction (e.g., for, and, nor, but, or, yet, so)  A comma is placed before the conjunction.  See FANBOYS.

Jack invited friends over, and they came to watch the game

They cheered for their team, but the team lost.

The game ended, yet they stayed stayed anyway.

They drank all his beer, so Jack had to go out for more.  

COORDINATED WITH A SEMICOLON

Two independent clauses with different subjects and closely related central ideas may also be joined with a semicolon.  The relationship between the two sentences (i.e., add ti on, contrast, result) must be guessed from the context.

Jack invited friends over; they came to watch the game

They cheered for their team; the team lost.

The game ended; they stayed stayed anyway.

They drank all his beer; Jack had to go out for more.

 

Traditionally called "compound" sentences. (See Grammar Notes.) In current linguistic description, "compound" is limited to the joining of two words: sweetheart, blackbird, copycat, egghead, socio-economic, etc.) Also ee Hyphens

 

 

 

 

 

Exceptions

Expressions with a comma splice

Pinocchio

 

 

The ... , the ...

EXPRESSIONS

Paired comparative (more, -er) phrases such as the ones below, are separated by a comma and do not include a connector. [the + comparative + subject + verb]

The more he lied, the longer his nose grew.

The older I get, the happier I am.

The more we saw them, the more we liked them.

The harder I try, the more difficult it becomes.

The longer I wait, the angrier I get.

The stranger the story, the better the movie.

MEANINGS

More of X causes more of Y.

His lying caused his nose to grow longer. (Pinocchio)

I become happier as I grow older.

We liked them more as we got to know them.

Even though I try hard, it remains very difficult.

I'm getting angrier as each minute passes.

Strange stories make more interesting movies.  

 

See The more, the more.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Common Mistakes

Errors and Solutions

 

 

 

ERROR SOLUTION


Jack watched football all day the game lasted hours
.

Run-on Sentence - separate clauses:   2 different subjects - 2 different verbs


Jack watched football all day.  (period)    The game lasted hours.
Separate clauses.  Use a period and a capital letter.

Jack watched football all day, (comma) and  the game lasted hours.
Separate clauses. Use a comma and a connector.
 

Jack cheered his team but they lost.

Missing comma:  2 different subjects - 2 different verbs

Jack cheered his team, (comma) but  they lost.
Separate clauses. Use a comma with the connector.
 

Jack worked on his computer and he went to the gym.
"Wordy" sentence:  1 subject - 2 different verb

Jack worked on his computer and [Jack] went to the gym.
Use a connector to join verbs.

 

My friend and I blogged and read over his shoulder.
Unclear (Who is doing what?):  2 different subjects - 2 verbs
 

My friend blogged, and I read over his shoulder.
Separate clauses with either a period or a comma.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grammar Notes

Traditional and Linguistic Description

Advanced

 

 

TRADITIONAL GRAMMAR LINGUISTIC DESCRIPTION

In traditional grammar, a conjunction and a coordinating conjunction differ in that a conjunction joins grammatically alike sub-clausal elements, whereas a coordinating conjunction joins grammatically alike clausal elements. (Azar 16-4)  (Swan 510.1-2)

In linguistic description, "coordination is the relation between elements of equal syntactic status, and as such contrast with subordination [unequal syntactic structure]."     "Properties of prototypical coordinators" (Huddleston   15 §2.1)   

conjunction – is a term for a word that joins two like elements, such as nouns, verbs, adjectives, adverbs, or phrases (but not clauses).

 

conjunction – is a logic function of A + B "both";   ("and" and sometimes "or") Caffeine is found in coffee and tea. Caffeine is found in coffee or tea. ("both").
disjunction – is the logic function of  A / B "one or the other, but not both", "either"; ("or" / "nor") Would you like coffee or tea?  ("one not the other")
 

coordinating conjunctions —for, and, nor, but, or, yet, and so — join independent clauses.  The resulting construction is a compound sentence.

 

coordinatorsand, but, or, and nor— join a variety of syntactically alike structures both sub-clausal (NP, VP, AdjP, AdvP, etc.) and clausal

symmetric constructions –  He got up and he poured some coffee.  (Clause + Clause)
asymmetric constructions – He got up and  __ poured some coffee. (Clause + NP);   "gapped coordination" (Huddleston 15 §4.2);

conditional constructions with and – Look at it and you'll see what I mean.  (Huddleston 15 §2.2.2.4)
 

compound sentence– In traditional grammar, the joining of two independent clauses is called a compound sentence.

In current linguistic description, "compound" is limited to the joining of two words: sweetheart, blackbird, copycat, egghead, socio-economic, etc.)  See  Hyphens  compounds.
 

CATEGORIES:  NP –noun phrase; N – noun; VP – verb phrase; V – verb; PP – prepositional phrase; P – preposition; AdvP – adverb phrase; Adv – adverb; AdjP– adjective phrase; Adj – adjective: Clause – nonfinite / finite

 

Resources

 

 

 

 

 

Practice 1

TV Soccer Fan

players
 

 

Identify whether the sentence is a run-on or a sentence.

  1. Select a response correct or incorrect.
  2. Compare your response to the feedback by clicking the "Check 1-10" button at the bottom, or click the "Check" button to the left  as you go.

 

1.
The best soccer match ever was the 2005 Champions League Final between AC Milan and Liverpool.

   

2.
We sat back and watched AC Milan take control of the game.

   

3.
They ended the game and the score was 3–0.

   

4.
Steven Gerrard pulled one back in the 54th minute and I was really impressed by how he rallied his teammates.
pull one back – be only one point behind the other team
rally – to gain support

   

5.
The game neared the end of the 90 minutes, I remember screaming and shouting in joy when Liverpool kept on scoring.

   

6.
I was watching the overseas game on cable and it was late at night.
overseas (N) – on a different continent and time zone

   

7.
I was shouting loudly but my wife was trying to sleep upstairs.

   

8.
She came downstairs and was angry with me for waking her up.

   

9.
I continued watching the game and couldn't take my eyes off the action.

   

10.
The game ended with Liverpool pulling ahead by one point and AC Milan losing 6–5.

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Practice 2

Soccer Fan

 

 

 

Read for Errors

I went to a soccer game today it was exciting.  I cheered for my team but they didn't win. My team was playing pretty well and the other team was too. Both offense and defense played well but were unlucky. One player fouled another player and the referee blew his whistle. The striker kicked the ball to the goal but it hit the post. 

The goalie caught the ball, he threw it to a teammate. The player hit it with his shoulder the referee didn't see it. One guy he fell down and he grabbed his leg as if he was hurt. The players made some great shots it was exciting. The scores of both teams were close I thought they might tie. The later it got the more anxious we became.

defense (N) – players protecting the goal

offense (N) – players attacking the goal (trying to make a goal)

referee (N) – person who judges the fairness of a play

 

 

 

 

 

Edit the sentence for run-on errors.

  1. Edit the sentence(s) in the text box.
  2. Compare your response to the feedback by clicking the "Check 11-20" button at the bottom, or click the "Check" button to the left  as you go.

 

11.
I went to a soccer game today it was exciting.


12.
I cheered for my team but they didn't win.


13.
My team was playing pretty well and the other team was too.


14.
Both offense and defense played well but were unlucky.


15.
One player fouled another player and the referee blew his whistle.


16.
The striker kicked the ball to the goal but it hit the post.


17.
The goalie caught the ball, he threw it to a teammate.


18.
The player hit it with his shoulder the referee didn't see it.


19.
One guy he fell down and he grabbed his leg as if he was hurt.


20.
The players made some great shots it was exciting.


21.
The scores of both teams were close I thought they might tie.


22.
The later it got the more anxious we became.