Bulleted Lists  (Bullet Lists)

Compare styles for wording and punctuating vertical lists

bullet hole list
 

 

Which is easier to read?

Block text visually runs text together. It is wordy but saves space.  Using more than three or four lines on a web page causes the reader to skip over the last few lines. Did you actually read this last line?

A bulleted or numbered list:

  • visually emphasizes information
  • capsulizes a concept
  • facilitates reading comprehension
 

 

 

Vertical Lists

Is a bulleted or numbered list punctuated like a sentence or is it something else all together?

Before the word-processor, writers used outlines, in which prioritized list-items were separated by roman numerals, letters, and numbers. Or writers included list items in text, separated by commas or semicolons.  When Microsoft Word featured bulleted and numbered lists, that changed everything!  Or did it? 

While some rules for punctuating bulleted lists differ, most are the same as those used for in-text lists. The differences are the use of the bullet and the use of white space, which provide visual separation, reducing the need for punctuation.  The bulleted lists presented on this page are examples of list ("seriation") guidelines from a variety of business and academic style manuals, as noted in each section. (While the term "bulleted list" is used in style manuals, the term "bullet list" is more commonly used.)

 

 

 

A PUNCTUATED VERTICAL LIST A VERTICAL LIST

This list style has an introductory phrase followed by a series of words, phrases or clauses that form a complete the sentence.  Bullets set off each list item. Sentence punctuation occurs as usual. (This style is used to set off a list from a larger body of writing. If the list does not require visual emphasis, then the items should be set into regular text style.) 

Another list style includes an introductory phrase followed by single words or short phrases. The vertical format and bullets set off each list item.  Additional punctuation is considered to be repetitive and unnecessary. This style is commonly used when the list is independent of a larger body of writing.

PHRASES SEPARATED BY COMMAS

Job applicants will need to have:

  • a high-school degree, 
  • a bachelors degree,
  • two years of experience,
  • three recommendations.

Q: Are commas and semicolons redundant (repetitive) when using bullets?
A:  Most manuals advise against using them, such as Chicago Manual of Style (6.127-30); APA (64).
 

INFORMAL LIST  (no attempt to make a sentence)

Items to take with you:

  • sunscreen
  • towel
  • bathing suit
  • sun umbrella

Q: Does an informal list, for example in a summer-camp flier, need capitalization and punctuation?
A:   The informal style tends to use no punctuation for the list-items, and depending on the level of informality, may omit the colon after the introductory phrase as well.

PHRASES SEPARATED BY PERIODS

Job applicants will need to have:

–  A high-school degree. (AP Stylebook)

–  A bachelors degree.

–  Two years of experience.

–  Three recommendations.

Q: Does the period after the list item mean that an applicant needs only one item to qualify?
A: Logically speaking, a period at the end of each list-item would indicate the introductory phrase plus ANY (one) list-item makes a complete sentence. The result is an OR statement.
 

PUNCTUATION –QUESTION

What is the best sun-protection?

  • T-shirt
  • sunscreen
  • wet suit
  • UPF shirt 
  • sun umbrella


Q:  In a list posing a question, where should the writer logically place the question mark, after each item or after the introductory sentence?
A:  In multiple choice style questions, it makes more sense to place the question mark with the introductory phrase.

PHRASES SEPARATED BY SEMI-COLONS

Job applicants will need to have    (APA Manual)

  • a high-school degree, GED or diploma; 
  • a bachelors degree, B.A., A.B., or B.S;
  • two years of experience, in marketing or branding;
  • three recommendations, high school, college, and recent employer.

Q: Does the period after the final list item mean that an applicant needs all four items to qualify?
A: Logically speaking, a semicolon or period at the end of the final item would indicate that ALL other items are part of the series concluding with the final list item. (AND)
 

PUNCTUATING FINAL LIST ITEM – ADVERTISING

Winners will receive

  • free airfare
  • a rental car
  • a hotel stay
  • dinner for two
  • and much more!

Q: In a promotional or commercial list, does punctuation distract the eye from the message? 

Q: How does punctuation of a promotional list differ from that of a Power Point presentation at a business meeting? (See tables below for phrase length conventions.)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vertical List

Style Manual Guidelines

 

Style Manual Abbreviations: AP (Associated Press Stylebook), APA (American Psychological Association), CMOS (Chicago Manual of Style), GREGG (Gregg Reference Manual); MLA (MLA Handbook)

 

Chicago Manual and Associated Press

CHICAGO MANUAL OF STYLE   (CMOS) ASSOCIATED PRESS STYLEBOOK  (AP)

"A vertical list is best introduced by a complete grammatical sentence, followed by a colon. Items carry no closing punctuation unless they consist of complete sentences. If the items are numbered, a period follows the numeral and each item begins with a capital letter.  To avoid long, skinny lists, short items may be arranged in two or more columns.  If items run over a line, the second and subsequent lines are usually indented."  (CMOS 6.127-28) 

"AP uses dashes, not bullets, for lists in news stories that follow a colon. After each dash, capitalize the first letter and use periods at the end of each section."  AP Stylebook Online (2009) Ask the Editor FAQ

A computer lab should include:

  • ergonomic desks
  • comfortable chairs
  • well-lighted areas
  • adjustable monitors
  • broadband Internet
  • dual-platform systems
  • secure log ins
  • accessibility software
 

Write about your qualifications:   (initial capitals for longer phrases)

  • To illustrate with examples areas of competency
  • To detail skill sets
  • To demonstrate instances of applying creative thinking

To shut down your computer:    (Periods occur after list items that are sentences.)

  1. Close all windows.
  2. Quit all open applications.
  3. Log out of your profile.
  4. Shutdown (Start menu / Apple menu).
      

These are letters and types of service most common in nationwide transmissions:

–  Spot DataStream news.

–  AP Basic service.

–  Most advances.

–  Weekly Features service.

–  Business and financial DataStream news.

–  Limited DataStream news.

 

AP Stylebook "Filing the Wire", p. 390 (See dash p. 327.)

The Chicago Manual of Style. 15th ed. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 2003. Print.
The Chicago Manual of Style. Web. http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org

Goldstein, Norm, ed. The Associated Press Stylebook and Briefing on Media Law. New York: Basic, 2007. Print.
AP Stylebook Online [2010]. Associated Press. Web.  http://www.apstylebook.com/

See Resources / Works Cited

 

 

 

Microsoft Manual / APA

MICROSOFT MANUAL OF STYLE FOR TECHNICAL PUBLICATIONS   (MMSTP) AMERICAN PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSOCIATION  (APA)

"Introduce a list with a sentence or fragment ending with a colon. Begin each entry in a bulleted or numbered list with a capital. Use complete sentences. Use parallel construction. Use a period after each entry." (MMSTP 172)

"Alternatively, you may use bulleted lists within a sentence to separate three or more elements.  In these instances, capitalize and punctuate the list as if it were a complete sentence."  (includes conjunctions)

The report should include:

  • Text
  • Tables
  • Diagrams
  • Pictures

The word processor can:  

  • Create reports and fliers.
  • Compose letters.
  • Make data tables.
  • Perform file merges.

To shutdown your computer:   

  1. Close all windows.
  2. Quit all open applications.
  3. Log out of your profile.
  4. Shutdown (Start menu).

 

A bulleted list with introductory statement and each list item written as a complete sentence.

Using the learned helplessness theory, we predicted that the depressed and nondepressed participants would make the following judgments of  control:

  1. Individuals who…
  2. Nondepressed persons exposed to…
  3. Depressed persons exposed to…
  4. Depressed and non depressed participants …

("Seriation" 3.04)  

 

A bulleted list within a sentence capitalized and punctuated as if it were a complete sentence.

In accordance with this theory, these relations should be marked by

  • equity, social justice, and equal opportunity;
  • sensitivity to individual differences and the promotion of… ;
  • affirmative actions to correct ontogenetic or historical inequities… ;
  • efforts to recognize and celebrate diversity; and
  • promotion of universal participation in civic life, and hence democracy (Lerner, Balsano, Banik, & Naudeau, 2005, p. 45)

("Seriation" 3.04)
 

 Microsoft Manual of Style for Technical Publications., 3rd ed. Redmond: Microsoft Press 2003. Print.

Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association. 6th ed. Washington, DC:  American Psychological Association, 2010. Print.   

 

 

MLA — In text lists

MLA HANDBOOK (MLA)  

"Use commas to separate words, phrases, and clauses in a series."  The MLA Handbook recommends in-text lists. In other words, don't include bulleted lists. If you cannot paraphrase, then include a table or appendix that presents your list of items. 

However, in the manual itself a numbered list occurs!  (MLA 136, 5.4.1)

During the recession, everyone had their wages cutback, millions lost their jobs, tens of thousands lost their homes, many more suffered hunger and hardship.

 

 

 

 

Entries for publications in print periodicals consist of several elements in a prescribed sequence.  This list shows most of the possible components of an entry for an article in a print periodical and the order in which they are normally arranged:

  1. Author's name (for more than one author, see 5.5.4; for a corporate author, see 5.5.5; for an anonymous work, see 5.5.9)
  2. Title of the article (in quotation marks)
  3. Name of the periodical (italicized)
  4. Series number or name (if relevant; see 5.4.4)
  5. Volume number (for a scholarly journal)
  6. Issue number (if available, for a scholarly journal)
  7. (list continues)

 

MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers. 7th ed. New York:  The Modern Language Association of America. 2009. Print

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vertical List

Introductory Statements

 

 

colon

Introductory statement followed by colon  

PHRASE CLAUSE

Introduce the list with an introductory phrase or clause and a colon. Optionally, omit articles (a, an, the) from the beginning of list items. (Also, note exception below using a period after the into.)  Some style manuals do not encourage the use of a phrase as the introductory statement.

Make sure that each list item reads grammatically with the introductory phrase or clause. If a list has fewer than three items, use an in-text list instead of a vertical list.

INTRODUCTORY PHRASE INTRODUCTORY SENTENCE

My duties at Tzonga were:    (phrase)

  • planning 
  • selecting
  • organizing
  • inviting
  • overseeing
  • cleaning up
  • collecting

(CMOS 6.127- 6.130) 
 

Our responsibilities included a variety of tasks:  (independent clause )

  • Fundraising events were planned biannually.
  • Venues and speakers were selected for each event.
  • Caterers, florists and greeters were hired to assist at events.
  • Invitations were emailed to encourage donor attendance.
  • Blind-auctions were used to raise additional money.
  • Events were hosted to network potential donors.
  • Donations were followed by thank-you letters.

(CMOS 6.127- 6.130)  (APA 3.04)
 

INTRODUCTORY PHRASES INTRODUCTORY SENTENCE

I co-managed:    (phrase)

Co-managed:    (shortened phrase)

My duties at Tzonga included   (example word)

My duties were, for example: 

The decisions I made were:   (verb)

The board consists of:   (preposition)

Co-managed $1M in nationwide marketing activities for an industry leading 3D animation software.  (Use a complete sentence ending with a period.)

  • Researched competitive landscape and devised a marketing plan used to aggressively target a new industry segment.
  • Led co-marketing programs including customer testimonials, product demonstrations, event planning.
  • Surveyed over 50,000 customers online gathering usage intelligence used in developing product road maps.

"Beverly B. Student: Resume & Cover Letter." USC Marshall School of Business. 2010-2011 

 

INTRODUCTORY CLAUSE WITH DETAILS INTRODUCTORY CLAUSE AS A SUMMARY

*Avitz Rental Cars offers you a clean, new, rental car, including:

  • 30 days insurance coverage
  • a full tank of gas
  • no early drop-off fees

*Incorrect. The purpose of an introductory statement is to introduce the items not include them.  
 

Avitz Rental Cars offers you a full package:  (Intro is the summary.)

  • a clean, new rental car      (List items are the details.)
  • 30 days insurance coverage
  • a full tank of gas
  • no early drop-off fees

 

 

 

Introductory phrase ending with "for example"

FOR EXAMPLE WORDS AS FOLLOWS

The following introductory statements may be written more simply without the example word at the end.

My duties at Tzonga were, for example 

My duties covered all aspects of fundraising, including:

My duties covered all aspects of fundraising, which included:

My duties covered all aspects of fundraising, namely:

The board consisted of a variety of officers, such as 

See For example (lists)

 

My duties at Tzonga included a variety of tasks:  (independent clause)

My duties were as follows:    (independent clause)

Ending an introductory statement with an example word is unnecessary: (independent clause)

  • It repeats the function of the bullets (to introduce examples).
  • It is tacked onto the introductory statement as a modifying clause (thus, the examples are part of the modifying clause and not the main clause).
  • It is wordy.

 

 

 

Introductory phrase – ending with a verb or a preposition

VERTICAL LIST HORIZONTAL LIST
iNTRO W/ FINAL VERB INTRO W/ FINAL VERB

The white space between the verb and the list item in a vertical list is "forgiving".

The decisions I made were:  (verb is OK if items are listed vertically)

  • who was going
  • where we were going
  • how we were going
  • what time we were going

Ending an introductory clause with a verb is acceptable (formal) if it is a complete sentence.  

The company has not defined who its users are.   (independent clause)

  • Are they teens?
  • Are they male or female?
  • Are they technically savvy?
  • Are they professionals?

 

Placing an introductory phrase ending with a verb next to the list item in a horizontal list is awkward.

* The decisions I made were who was going, where we were going, how we were going, and what time we were going.

 

 

 

INTRO W/ FINAL PREPOSITION INTRO W/ FINAL PREPOSITION

The board consists of(colon is OK if items are listed vertically)

  • the president
  • the CEO
  • the CFO
  • investors

*The board consists of: the president, the CEO, the CFO, and investors. (Gregg 188-191)

 

 

 

 

Style manual details

CHICAGO MANUAL / MLA APA / GREGG REFERENCE MANAUL

A colon is normally used after "as follows"  (CMOS 6.65)

"A colon is not normally used after "namely", "for example" and similar expressions [in an in-text list]. Nor is it used before a series introduced  by a verb or a preposition." (CMOS 6.68)

An MLA formatted list (in-text only) includes an introductory clause followed by a colon. "The reading list includes three Latin American novels: The Death of Artemio Cruz, One Hundred Years of Solitude, and the Green House. (MLA 3.24)

 

APA  "Seriation"  includes examples in which the introductory clause is a complete sentence and examples in which the line items complete the the introductory statement. (APA 3.04)

(GREGG 188-191)

Colon: Introductory Phrases-Lists
Listing Examples 
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vertical List

List Items

 

 

slot machine: matched cherries

Parallel phrasing of list items

INFORMAL FORMAL

Each item should be "parallel", use the same word form: noun, verb, adjective, verb phrase (gerund, infinitive, noun phrase or clause). Choose one word form and use it for all list items. (The example below is good for a  personal "to do list", but not formal use.)

Each item below is "parallel", uses the same word form , and reads grammatically with the introductory phrase. Optional word forms: verbs, nouns, gerunds, infinitives, etc.

NOT PARALLEL PARALLEL

I was in charge of:

  • planning 
  • selected the venue and speakers (error)
  • organization of event (error)
  • invitations (error)
  • oversaw the event (error)
  • made sure to clean up (error)
  • donation collection (error)

I was in charge of:  (gerunds)

  • planning events 
  • selecting venues and speakers
  • organizing caterers, florists and greeters
  • sending out invitations
  • hosting and entertaining
  • cleaning up
  • collecting donations
    (If using noun forms, then a noun, a noun phrase, or a gerund may be included.)
     

 

I was in charge of:  (nouns, noun phrases)

  • event plans  
  • venue and speaker selection  
  • caterer, florist and greeter organization
  • invitation mailing
  • hosting and entertainment
  • clean up
  • donation collection

 

Related Pages: Parallel Phrasing,   Gerunds Parallel Phrasing, Parallel Phrasing in Bulleted Lists

 

 

Use capital letters

Capitalization in list items

LOWER CASE INITIAL CAPITAL

For words or short phrases, the initial letter of the first word of each list item is usually lower case; however, they can also be capitalized.  Apply the same capitalization style to all items.

For independent clauses (sentences), the initial letter of the first word of each list item is capitalized. AP Stylebook capitalizes all words and phrases. Chicago Manual of Style capitalizes all phrases and clauses.

 SINGLE WORDS – LOWERCASE CLAUSES / SENTENCES – UPPERCASE

Job responsibilities:

  • planning
  • selecting
  • organizing
  • inviting
  • overseeing
  • cleaning up
  • collecting

Chicago Manual lowercase

 

  • Planning
  • Selecting
  • Organizing
  • Inviting
  • Overseeing
  • Cleaning up
  • Collecting

AP capitalized


    

We promise the following:  

  • Every child will have a mentor. 
  • Every child will participate in an apprenticeship.
  • Every child will be part of team.
  • Every team will present its project at the end of the session.

Write about your qualifications:     (Each list item is an infinitive clause.)

  • To illustrate with examples areas of competency 
  • To detail skill sets
  • To demonstrate instances of applying creative thinking

  Chicago Manual & AP

 

SHORT PHRASES – LOWERCASE SENTENCES – UPPERCASE

We had several responsibilities:

  • planning events   (optional capitalization for short phrases)
  • selecting venues and speakers
  • organizing caterers, florists and greeters
  • sending out invitations
  • hosting and entertaining
  • cleaning up
  • collecting donations

Chicago Manual lowercase; AP capitalized

Our responsibilities included a variety of tasks:   

  • Fundraising events were planned biannually.
  • Venues and speakers were selected for each event.
  • Caterers, florists and greeters were hired to assist at the events.
  • Invitations were emailed to encourage donors to attend.
  • Blind-auctions were used to raise additional money.
  • Events were hosted to network with potential donors.
  • Donations were followed up with thank you letters.

Chicago Manual & AP

The Gregg Reference Manual and Microsoft Manual of Style for Technical Publication: Capitalize the first word in each list item re gar less of whether it is a word, phrase or clause.)

 

 

 

semicolon

Punctuation —  commas vs. semicolons

PUNCTUATED VERTICAL LIST VERTICAL LIST

In this list style, commas and semicolons are used after each bulleted list item . This style is used to set off text from a larger body of writing.  The punctuated list style is used to maintain the overall style of the document.

In this list style, bullets not commas or semicolons separate the list items. Typographically, the list has more visual clarity (is less messy).

PHRASES  (COMMAS) PHRASES (NO COMMAS)

You will be selected if you have:

  • a high-school degree, 
  • a bachelors degree,
  • two years of experience,
  • three recommendations.
     

 Use commas after phrases and a final period after the last item. Punctuating the list maintains the style of the larger body of writing.   

My duties included:

  • planning events  
  • selecting venues and speakers
  • organizing caterers,  florists and greeters
  • sending out invitations
  • overseeing the events

 The absence of punctuation marks increases visual clarity It is more informal.

 

PHRASES THAT ALREADY HAVE COMMAS (SEMI-COLONS) INDEPENDENT CLAUSES (PERIODS)

You will be selected if you have:

  • a high-school degree, GED or diploma; 
  • a bachelors degree, B.A., A.B., or B.S;
  • two years of experience, in marketing or branding;
  • three recommendations, high school, college, and recent employer.

Place a semicolon (rather than a comma) after each list item if any of the list items already includes a comma.

In my job, we had several responsibilities, for example:

  • Fundraising events were planned biannually.
  • Venues and speakers were selected for each event.
  • Caterers and florists were hired to assist at the events.
  • Invitations were emailed to encourage donors to attend.
  • Blind-auctions were used to raise additional money.
  • Events were hosted to network with potential donors.
  • Donations were followed up with thank you letters.

Independent clause definition   

CLAUSES (SEMI-COLONS)  

The committee decided:

  • a new budget director would be sought;
  • new fundraising drives would be started;
  • outstanding loans would be collected;
  • community partnerships would be established.

Place a semicolon after each list item if the items are clauses.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chicago Manual of Style: "Items carry no closing punctuation unless they consist of complete sentences."

 

 

 

Using a period

Periods after list items

USE A PERIOD USE NO PERIOD

Use a period at the end of a punctuated vertical list if:  (1)  the list items complete the sentence begun by the introductory phrase; (2) if the content of the list item is a complete sentence; (3) if the list is used within a larger body of writing. (In such a case, phrase the list as a vertical sentence.)

Use no period if: (1) the list is stylistically independent from a larger body of text or writing; (2) the list items are words or short phrases (sentence fragments); (3) the introductory statement is a complete sentence (independent clause) and does not require the list items to complete the sentence.

INTRODUCTORY STATEMENT FORMS A COMPLETE SENTENCE WITH LIST ITEMS PHRASES 

I had several management duties, including:  

  • planning events, selecting venues and speakers;
  • organizing caterers, florists and greeters;
  • sending out invitations;
  • overseeing the events, welcoming guests and cleaning up;
  • sending out thank-you notes and collecting donations. (period)

Place a period after the final list item, if the list items are grammatically essential to completing the sentence begun by the introductory phrase, (especially after such as, for example, including, namely.)

 

My duties varied:  

  • planning events
  • selecting venues and speakers
  • organizing caterers, florists and greeters
  • sending out invitations
  • overseeing the events
  • cleaning up
  • collecting donations

Chicago Manual no periods; AP periods

INTRODUCTORY STATEMENT FORMS A COMPLETE SENTENCE WITH LIST ITEMS SHORT PHRASES

In my job, I made decisions, such as:

  • who was going to plan the event, 
  • where the event was going to be,
  • how the event would be funded,
  • what the theme would be,
  • how many people we could invite. (period)

Place commas after list items that are phrases. However, place semicolons after all items if the phrases already include commas.)

 

In my job, I made decisions:

  • who was doing the planning
  • where we were building
  • how we were coordinating
  • when we were wrapping up

Chicago Manual lowercase; AP capitalized

 

EACH LIST ITEM IS A COMPLETE SENTENCE WORDS – NO ATTEMPT TO CREATE SENTENCES

In my job, we had several responsibilities, for example:

  • Fundraising events were planned biannually.
  • Venues and speakers were selected for each event.
  • Caterers and florists were hired to assist at the events.
  • Invitations were emailed to encourage donors to attend.
  • Blind-auctions were used to raise additional money.
  • Events were hosted to network with potential donors.
  • Donations were followed up with thank you letters. (period)

Education:

  • San Francisco State University, M. A.
  • University of California, Berkeley, A. B
  • University of California, Davis
  • Palos Verdes High School

Hobbies:

  • Dancing (tango and hip-hop)
  • Fishing (fly fishing)
  • Cycling (motocross)

 

AP Style: Use periods at the end of each section.  AP Stylebook Online (2009) Ask the Editor FAQ

 Microsoft Manual of Style  "Begin each entry in a bulleted or numbered list with a capital. Use complete sentences. Use parallel construction. Use a period after each entry."

Chicago Manual of Style: "Items carry no closing punctuation unless they consist of complete sentences."

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vertical Lists

Bulleted vs. Numbered

 

 

BULLETED LIST NUMBERED LIST

"Use a bulleted list for an unordered series of concepts, items or options rather than a sequence of events or steps. Capitalize the first word of each bulleted entry. Use parallel construction. Use a period at the end of each list item." Microsoft Manual of Style for Technical Publication p.49

A numbered list is used for a sequence of events or steps. Use a numbered list for a process in which the order of the items is important or in which all items are required.

NOT PUNCTUATED – COULD BE "ANY ITEM" NUMBERED – "ALL ITEMS"

You will be selected if you have:    (any one or all four?)

  • a high-school degree  (capitalization varies with style manual)
  • a bachelors degree
  • two years of experience
  • three recommendations

 A bulleted list may imply that any of the items is required to complete the introductory statement.

 

You will be selected if you have:   (all four items)

  1. a high-school degree
  2. a bachelors degree
  3. two years of experience
  4. three recommendations

A numbered list makes it clear to the reader that all items are required to complete the introductory statement.


 

PUNCTUATED –  INCLUDES ALL ITEMS NUMBERED – SUGGESTS ORDER OF IMPORTANCE

  You will be selected if you have:  (all four items)

  • a high-school degree,
  • a bachelors degree,
  • two years of experience,
  • three recommendations. (period)

You will be selected if you have:

  1. two years of experience
  2. a bachelors degree
  3. a high-school degree
  4. three recommendations

"The use of "numbered lists" may connote an unwanted or unwarranted ordinal position (e.g., chronology, importance, priority) among the items." (APA  3.04) 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Common Mistake

Error and Solution

 

 

 

Including And in a list

ERROR SOLUTION

My duties included:

  • planning events;
  • selecting, organizing and finding venues and speakers; and
  • sending out invitations;
  • overseeing the events;
  • cleaning up  and
  • collecting donations.

Most manuals indicate it is unnecessary to set off text with bullets as well as add punctuation and conjunctions.  If you want to use semicolons (;) and conjunctions, delete the bullets and just write a sentence.

APA examples do indicate that it is acceptable to use a conjunction in a list.  APA  

Chicago Manual Q& A – "If your list forms a sentence, yes, semicolons work well, and there’s no rule against using and."

 

(1) Remove "and".  The conjunction is not needed in a vertical list.

(2) Include the list in the body of the text (as a horizontal list).

 

My duties included planning events; selecting, organizing and finding venues and speakers; sending out invitations, overseeing the events, cleaning up and collecting donations.

Either use a vertical list and let the bullets function as the separators, or use an in-line list and use full punctuation and conjunctions.

My duties included (1) planning events; (2) selecting, organizing and finding venues and speakers; (3) sending out invitations (4) overseeing the events, cleaning up  and (5) collecting donations.

 

 

 

Solution - lightbulb  PopQ 11/16/2008

 

 

 

 

 

Resources

Style Manuals

 

Resources 

Style Manual Abbreviations (used in this website)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Practice 1 – 8

Punctuate the Bullet List

Word bullet options

 

Moved to next page: Bullet List Practice