Grammar-QuizzesVerb PhrasesVerbsPresent Tense › Possession States

Present Tense — Possession States(static verbs / stative verbs)

Indicate possession and ownership

My puppy has a ball with her ball.

 

Possession vs. Experience

POSSESSESION

A static verb expresses "a state being". The verbs below are used for "possession" (have, belong, own, posses). They express a passive relationship to a noun. They are mostly nonprogressive. 

POSSESS

My dog has a ball.  (temporary or permanent hold on)

The dog belongs my sister.  (is under guardianship, in care of)

My dog has blond fur.  (exists with this characteristic)

She will possess your heart. (take hold of)

We own a house with a backyard. (hold leagal papers)

We hold  the title to our house. (hold legal papers)

Secretariat holds the title as the fastest horse ever. (is known for, is distinguished for)  

EXPERIENCE

Below, have expresses passively experiencing a feeling or circumstance. No one is taking action to do something. These expressions are mostly progressive (but not when used for health problems.)

EXPERIENCE PASSIVELY

We are having fun!   [a great morning, a good time] 

We are having trouble [difficulty, a hard time].

We are having such good luck [bad luck]. (experience fortune)

We are having a boring day [exciting afternoon]

We are having a drought [a harsh winter].  (experience weather)

He has a headache.  (experience illness–not progressive)

He has the flu.  (experience illness–not progressive)

 

ball (N) an elegant social dancing event; ball (N) – a round (spherical) play toy; have a ball (expression) – have fun

Also see "Be" vs. "Have" expressions.

 

 

 

 

 

 

"Have"

Expressions

 

 

Have—hosting vs. eating something

HAVING—HOSTING

Having a turkey for dinner could mean inviting a turkey as a guest, or it could mean eating a (just one) turkey at dinner. Slang: He's a turkey – a foolish person

a guestWe are having a turkey for dinner.

             

He's having a birthday party.  (host) 

We're having some visitors from overseas.  (host) 

HAVING—CONSUMING

Having turkey for dinner simply means eating turkey meat for dinner.   See Food Quantifiers for meat.

roast turkeyWe are having turkey for dinner.

 

We are having a drink in the lobby. (sitting and enjoying)

We are having dinner/ lunch/ breakfast. (eat)

 

 

 

 

 

 
MEANING EXAMPLE

AWAIT THE BIRTH  (V)

We are having a baby.   (Later a couple would say, " We have a baby.")

BE RELATED  (V)

I have four brothers.

ACCEPT RELATIONSHIP (V)

She didn't want to marry him.  She wouldn't have him.

EXPERIENCE (V)

We're having a great time.

HOLD IN MIND (V)

I have an idea.

BE IDENTIFIED BY (V)

She has a mole on her left cheek.

CARRY ON / CARRY OUT (V)

Let's have a little talk.  Let's have a look.

ASSERT (V)

Rumor has it that Brad Pitt will be doing the movie.

HOLD ADVANTAGE (V)

They have it over us by at least three points.

TO BE DECEIVED (V)

The investors were had by the con artist. (crook)

PUT IN A POSITION (V)

The other chess player had him on the defensive.

GAIN POSSESSION (V)

There was none to be had at any price.

ADVISE (V)

You had better go. You had better not say anything.

BECOME TIRED OR DEFEATED (V)

We have had it with his complaining all the time. Enough!

DESERVE (V)

He had it coming to him after treating her so badly. (misfortune)

SETTLE A DISPUTE (V)

Let's have it out.  I don't want to keep fighting.

WEAR (V)

She had on a beautiful white, sleeveless ball gown.

ATTACK (V)

It's time to have at my homework.  (informal)

BE UNRELATED; TO AVOID (V)
 

We have nothing to do with that situation. 

She has nothing to do with him anymore.

Solution - lightbulb   Pop-Q Have got   
Also see Phrasal Verbs- have

 

 

 

 

 

 

Have vs. Have Got

British Variation

 

 

 

 Have vs. Have Got

HAVE

Have is used for possession and actions (to experience) such as "IWe're having fun", "She's having a baby".

He has money. (Eng-US – possession)

I usually have dinner at 8:00 p.m.    (eat )
I usually have had by 8:00 p.m.    (action completed – eaten )
 

HAVE GOT

Have got is used for possession more commonly in British English (while have gotten has a meaning of acquiring something by some unmentioned means.)

He has got money. ( Eng.–Br. – possession)
He has gotten money.   (acquired it or received it by some means – US-Eng)

I usually have got dinner at 8:00 p.m.
I usually have gotten dinner by 8:00.   (acquired or received it)
 

 

 

 

 

 

Common Mistakes

Errors & Solutions

 

 

 

Error and Solution

ERROR

*I have twenty-one years.

*I'm have  trouble with my washing machine.

*I've trouble with my washing machine.

*My puppy has six months. She is having a ball.
 Pop-Q "Have a ball"

SOLUTION

am twenty-one.  I am twenty-one-years old.  (Use be instead of have.)
 

I'm having trouble with my washing machine. 

I have trouble with my washing machine. (Have – for possession – cannot be contracted.)

My puppy is six months old. (Use is not has.)

She has a ball. (possession)

She is having a ball with it.

 

ball (N) an elegant social dancing event; from Fr. baler - to dance

ball (N) – a round (spherical) play toy

have a ball (expression) – have fun

Solution - lightbulbPop-Q "Having"

 

 

 

 

 

 

Practice 1

Possession vs. Have Expression

driver
 

 

Present or present progressive?

  1. Select the response from the list that best completes the sentence. 
  2. Compare your response to the feedback by clicking the "check" button.

 

1.

2.


En-US – license, En–Br: licence

3.
  They were supposed to send my permanent license a week ago. " 

4.
The officer noticed that his wife was pregnant and uncomfortable.  He asked, "Are you OK?"     

5.

6.
 
"Okay!  Let's go!" he responded.

 

 

 

 

 

Practice 2

Have vs. Having

Googling answers
 

 

Present or present progressive?

  1. Select the response from the list that best completes the sentence. 
  2. Compare your response to the feedback by clicking the "check" button.

 

7.
(exist)

8.

9.
  (held, hosted) 
(trivia = knowledge game of general and specific knowledge)

10.
 (beat us)

11.
 

12.
 

13.
 

14.
(advice) 

pull a fast one on us (expression) – deceive or trick)

15.
 (deserved)

16.
  (experienced, enjoyed)