Much / More

Add to the amount of something

healthy food
 

 

More + Noun

MORE + NONCOUNT NOUN

Use more before a noncount noun to express an additional amount to the previous (earlier) or existing (current) amount.

People have more knowledge about eating healthier food.

Consuming more red wine may hold the secret to youth.

More fiber helps digestion.

More potassium helps regulate blood pressure.
 

MORE + COUNT NOUN

Use more before a count noun to express an additional number of items to the previous (earlier) or existing (current) amount.

More people are eating healthier food.

People want to consume more anti-oxidants.

Eating more vegetables adds fiber to one's diet.

Eating more bananas adds potassium and vitamin C to your diet.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Much More / Many More

An even greater amount

 

 

 

Much More / Many More + Noun

MUCH MORE + NONCOUNT NOUN

Use much more before a noncount noun for emphasis on a greater amount.

People have much more knowledge about eating right.

People eat much more food  than they should.

How much more fiber does a banana have?
 

MANY MORE + COUNT NOUN

Use many more before a count noun for emphasis on a greater number.

Many more people are eating healthier diets.

People take in many more calories than they need.

How many more bananas can the monkey eat?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Too Much / Too Many of Something

An excessive amount

A vending machine
 

 

Too Much / Too Many + Noun

TOO MUCH + NONCOUNT NOUN

Use too much for an unacceptable, excessive amount.  Use too (adv) to modify much, a quantifier to a noncount noun.

People eat too much fat, sugar and salt.

Prepared food includes too much packaging.  (plastic, boxes, padding)

The cook put much too much salt in the soup.  (much too much is informal)

I have a little too much sugar in the tomato sauce. 
 

TOO MANY + COUNT NOUN

Use too many for an unacceptable, excessive amount. Use too (adv) to modify many, a quantifier to a count noun.

People eat too many chips, cookies and candy bars.

Vending machines sell too many high-calorie snacks.

The cook put far too many beans in the soup.   (far too many is informal)

I have a few too many cloves of garlic in the tomato sauce. 

 

Note: too (adverb) modifies much (a quantifier or determiner).
Also see: "Too / Enough" + Infin    

 

 

 

 

 

 

Much  / More + Adj

A greater quality

apples
 

 

Much -ER / Much More + Adjective

MUCH MORE + ADJECTIVE -ER

Use much (adv.) to emphasize  a comparative adjective, -er.  (also: far, rather, a little, a bit, a lot)

This apple is much better than that one.  (good - better)

This apple is much redder than the other one.  (red)

This apple is a bit heavier than that one.  (heavy)

This apple is far uglier than that one.  (ugly)

MUCH MORE +ADJECTIVE

Use much (adv.) to emphasize  a comparative adjective, more. (also: far, rather, a little, a bit, a lot)

This apple is much more beautiful than that one. 

This apple is far more flavorful than the other one. 

This apple is a bit more exceptional than that one. 

This apple is a lot more desirable than that one. 

 

Note: much (adverb) modifies more (adverb) which modifies beautiful (adjective).
Also see: Comparisons   

 

 

 

 

 

 

Synonyms for Much

Other ways of increasing an amount

He is too old for her.
 

 

Much / Far / A Bit / Rather / Way — Too

TOO + ADJ

Use too to modify an adjective creating the meaning of an unacceptable, excessive degree. (also: far, rather, a little, a bit)

Heff is too old for her.

She is too young for him.

Elena is too tall.

You are too kind    (a compliment with emphasis)

Hugh is too confident (He'll be disappointed.)

It is too soon  to know if the marriage will last.

I have to work late too often .  

He's too smart to allow another player to score a goal.
 

MUCH TOO / FAR TOO + ADJ

Use much to modify too before an adjective creating a meaning of greater, excessive degree. (also: far, rather, a little, a bit)

Heff is much too old for her.

She is far too young for him.  (also: a bit too young)

Elena is much too tall. (also: a bit too tall)

You are much too kind to me. (also: far too kind)

Hugh is a little too confident  that he'll win.  (also: a bit too confident)

It is a bit too soon  to know if the marriage will last.  (also: far too soon)

I have to work late rather too often  (also: far too often)

He's way too smart to give that point away.  (way – informal speech)

 

Note: much (adverb) modifies too (adverb).

 

 

 

 

 

 

Common Mistakes

Errors and Solutions

 

 

 

Error and Solution

ERROR

I want much.   

 

She is too much tall. 
Don't use too (adv) to modify much when making comparison.

 

Expression:  "She is too much."  She has an unusual or overpowering personality.   

SOLUTION

I want more in life.  The concept "more" is an ideal (undefined, noncount)
I want much more in life. 

She is much too tall.   
move overfewer agrees with coun noun
Use much (adv) to modify too (excessive): She is much too tall to dance with me.

I have too much olive oil.   Use too (adv) to modify much (a quantity).  
move overfewer agrees with coun noun 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Practice 1

Improvements in Phones

smart phones
 

 

Complete the sentence with a comparative expression.

  1. Select the response from the list that best completes the sentence. 
  2. Compare your response to the feedback by clicking the "check" button.

 

1.


2.
(available (adj) – easily found)

3.

4.

5.

6.


7.


8.


9.

10.
 

11.


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Practice 2

Healthcare in the Old West

Old West healthcare
 

 

"Old West" refers to the early settlers in the western U.S.  

 

 

 

Read for Errors

Life is much more easier these days.  A hundred years ago people had lesser access to medicine. In the Old West (U.S.), there were few big cities, so people lived much farther apart.  If a person became sick, a family would have to carry the person a long way to find a doctor. Sometimes, the distance was much too far for the person who was sick.

A great more people died of diseases such as cholera, measles and typhoid.  There were also lot fewer healthcare professionals. They didn't have much more training than "word of mouth".  A barber or a priest couldn't offer much more than comfort to a sick person.  Few people lived to old age, and young people died a way too soon.

access (n.) – a way or means to get to something

barber (n.) – a professional who shaves faces, cuts hair (and in the old days pulled teeth and gave first aid.)

"Old West" refers to the early settlers in the western U.S.  

word of mouth – information passed from one individual to another

 

 

 

 

 

12.
Life is much more easier these days.

   

13.
A hundred years ago people had lesser access to medicine.
   

14.
In the Old West, there were fewer big cities, so people lived much farther apart

   


farther / further
15.
If a person became sick, a family would have to carry the person a long way to find a doctor. Sometimes, the distance was much too much far for the person who was sick.

   

16.
A great more people died of diseases such as cholera, measles and typhoid. 

   

17.
There were also lot fewer healthcare professionals.

   

18.
They didn't have many more training than "word of mouth".

   

19.
A barber or a priest couldn't offer much more than comfort to a sick person.

   

20.
Few people lived to old age, and young people died a way too soon.