Like / As

Are you comparing something to a noun or to a clause?

unequal

 

 

 

Like vs. AS

LIKE + NOUN

Like means "same form, appearance, kind, character" and is followed by a noun or noun phrase. The verb is often static, such as be, seems, looks, acts

BEFORE A NOUN

My friend is like me.  (prep.)

He seems smart like a fox. 

He acts more like a brother than a friend. 

He looks like a handsomer version of me. 

BEFORE A  NOUN + MODIFIERS

He is like a younger brother who has known me all my life. 

We are like two comedians when we get together. 

BEFORE A  GERUND  (NON-FINITE CLAUSE)

Talking with him is like talking to myself.

AS + CLAUSE

As means "in the manner" and is followed by a clause (subj + verb).

CLAUSE

My friend thinks as I do (I think).  (conj.)

He is as smart as a fox . 

He acts more as a brother would (act). 

 

It is as if he has known me all my life.

We behave as though we were two comedians.

 

I talk with him in a way similar to the way I talk to myself.

 

(Huddleston 1154)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Like

Additional Meanings

 

 

 

Like — other meanings

VARIANT MEANING EXAMPLES

OF THE SAME FORM (adj.)  

I haven't seen a like model.   We collect trains, cars, buses and like models.

OF THE SAME FORM (noun)

I haven't seen its like.    We collect model t trains, cars, buses and their like.

CHARACTERISTIC (prep.)

It would be like him to forget my birthday.

SIMILAR OR COMPARABLE (prep.)

There is nothing like a tall cold drink.

EXAMPLE (adv.)

You could take up a hobby, like fishing, hiking or cycling.

SIMILAR OR COMPARABLE  (adv.)

He was a hippie-like guy with a tie-dye T-shirt.

INCLINED  (idiom–prep.)

Do you feel like going to a movie?

PROMISE / INDICATIVE (idiom- prep.)

It (the sky) looks like rain today.

REQUEST-PREFER (idiom–verb)

I'd like you to come with us.

SUIT YOUR PREFERENCE (idiom–verb)

You can come or you can go as you like.

 

 

 

Like – Informal

ATTENTION GETTER  (interjection)

Like, has anyone seen my cell phone lying around?

HESITATOR (uh.. or well...)

We were more... like... borrowing his car.

INTRODUCE REPORTED SPEECH

He's like, "You're totally wrong, " and I'm like, "No, way!"

AN EQUAL   (idiom)

We haven't seen the likes of him before.

AS IF (conj.)

I felt like I could stay there forever. (informal for as if)

 

 

 

 

 

 

As

Additional Meanings

 

 

 

As – other meanings

VARIANT MEANING EXAMPLES

EXAMPLE (adv.)

Some flowers, as the rose, require a lot of care.

CONSIDERED TO BE (adv.)

We view the church and state as two separate entities.

IN THE MANNER (adv.)

He paid for the room and dinner as agreed. (as we had agreed.)

AT THE TIME (conj)

Please pay as you leave.

WITH THE PURPOSE (conj.)

The speaker spoke so convincingly as to rally everyone to unite.

SINCE / BECAUSE (conj.)

As you are up, will you please get me a glass of water.

THOUGH (conj.)

Smart as he may be, he forgot to consider his own weaknesses.

THAT (pronoun)

I have had the same problem as you have.

TO THE EXTENT (idiom)

As far as I know, we still aren't done yet.

WHILE   (idiom)

As long as he is here, we'll never have peace!

IN ITS CURRENT CONDITION (idiom)

I bought the car as is. (in a non-negotiable, no-guarantee condition)

ALSO (idiom)

They are resourceful, intelligent as well as compassionate. 

IN RESPECT TO (idiom)

As for traveling to the war-zone, I wouldn't advise it.

BEGINNING / ENDING (idiom)

As of  April 1st, we are no longer accepting credit cards.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Common Mistakes

Errors and Solutions

 

 

 

ERROR SOLUTION

He was like "I'm so out here."
(Perhaps not an error, but certainly restricted to informal use.)  

He said, "I'm leaving."   or He said, "I've had enough!" 

He looks like he needs a place to rest.

He look likes a tired old dog.

He looks as if he needs a place to rest.  (as though)

He looks like a tired old dog.  (noun)

Solution - lightbulb Pop-Q "Like"

 

 

 

 

 

 

Practice

"Smart" Phones

cell phones at school
 

 

Complete the sentence.

  1. Select the response from the list that best completes the sentence. 
  2. Compare your response to the feedback by clicking the "Check 1-15" button at the bottom, or click the "Check" button to the left  as you go.

 

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

8.

9.

10.

11.

12.

13.


Gerunds

14.

15.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Practice 2

User-Experiencephone addict

 

 

Read for Errors

Comparing the telephone user experience of the iPhone and the Blackberry phone is as comparing apples to oranges.  The Blackberry opens to a keypad with true button-like keys that the user depresses.  However, the iPhone has a touch screen with virtual-like keys. The user will experience the  fat-finger effect if not careful. That is, the user may touch a neighboring key instead of the intended key.

  The Blackberry is a one-hand friendly telephone with speed-dial.  The iPhone cannot be used with one hand like earlier phones; it requires two hands to unlock the phone before dialing. Like the fat-finger effect, voice commands using Siri are also likely to cause errors.  If speaking in a noisy place, the user will hear a response like: "I'm not sure what you said, there." If the user says, "I am done," but Siri hears, "I am drunk, Siri dials a taxi, and then the user is like, "Nooooo!"

If the user loses the Blackberry, then the telephone and its address book are lost.  If the user loses the iPhone, it is like the person has lost a computer. Sensitive data like passwords, email, and other personal information are also lost.  It's like the user's personal life becomes open to whoever finds it.

Blackberry phones have their devoted users, who like the simplicity of the phone. Likely, iPhones have their devoted users, who appreciate the complexity of the phone.

Perhaps, the choice of the phone is very much as the person who buys it — simple or complex.

depress (v.) – push down

devoted (adj.) – loyal and loving

virtual (adj.) – not real; simulated

 

 

 

 

 

Edit for Errors

  1. Edit the sentence(s) in the text box.
  2. Compare your response to the feedback by clicking the "Check 16-25" button at the bottom, or click the "Check" button to the left  as you go.

 

16.
Comparing the "telephony" of the iPhone and the Blackberry phone is as comparing apples to oranges.  The Blackberry opens to a keypad with true button-like keys that the user depresses. 


17.
However, the iPhone has a touch screen with virtual-like keys. The user will experience the  fat-finger effect if not careful. That is, the user may touch a neighboring key instead of the intended key.


18.
The Blackberry is a one-hand friendly telephone with speed-dial.  The iPhone cannot be used with one hand like earlier phones; it requires two hands to unlock the phone before dialing.


19.
Like the fat-finger effect, voice commands using Siri are also likely to cause errors.  If speaking in a noisy place, the user will hear a response like: "I'm not sure what you said, there."


20.
If the user says, "I am done," but Siri hears, "I am drunk," Siri dials a taxi, and then the user is like, "Nooooo!"


21.
If the user loses the Blackberry, then the telephone and its address book are lost. If the user loses the iPhone, it is like the person has lost a computer.


22.
Sensitive data like passwords, email, and other personal information are also lost.


23.
It's like the user's personal life becomes open to whoever finds it.


24.
Blackberry phones have their devoted users, who like the simplicity of the phone. Likely, iPhones have their devoted users, who appreciate the complexity of the phone.


25.
Perhaps, the choice of the phone is very much as the person who buys it — simple or complex.