Whose

Add modifying clauses for personal possessive nouns

Arianna Stassinopoulos Huffington
 

 

Relative Pronoun for Personal Possession — whose

WHO

Who replaces a personal noun or pronoun in a modifying clause (relative clause).  See  Who / Whom.

SUBJECT OF CLAUSE

move over who modifies woman
The woman
  who is Greek is on the phone.
move clause rightShe is Greek.

OBJECT OF CLAUSE

move overwho modifies woman
The woman
  who(m) you met     is on the phone.
                             You met her.
 

WHOSE

Whose replaces a possessive noun in a modifying clause (relative clause).

SUBJECT OF CLAUSE

move overwhose modifies woman
The woman whose name is Greek is on the phone.
move clause hereHer name is Greek.

OBJECT OF CLAUSE

move overwho modifies woman
The woman whose son you met is on the phone.
                        You met her son.
 

 

Whose may also be used for inanimate nouns.  See Of Which / Whose.

 

 

 

 

 

Forming a Whose–Clause

Replacing the Subject or Object Possessive Noun

 

 

Whose as Subject or Object of the Modifying Clause

SUBJECT OF CLAUSE

Whose replaces the subject —possessive noun or pronoun— in the modifying clause. Then the clause is placed after the personal noun that it modifies.

The woman is on the phone. The woman's name is Greek.
The woman is on the phone. Her name is Greek.

  SUBJECT of MOD CLS  

The woman

Her name is Greek
move forward move forward

is on the phone.

 

  whose name

 

The woman

whose name is Greek

is on the phone.

OBJECT OF CLAUSE

Whose replaces the object —possessive noun or pronoun— in the modifying clause, which is placed after the personal noun it modifies.

The woman is on the phone.  You met the woman's son.
The woman is on the phone.  You met her son.

  OBJECT of MOD CLS  

The woman

You met her son
       move front   move front

is on the phone.

 

whose son

 

The woman

whose son you met

is on the phone.

 

Add commas if the clause adds extra information that is not essential to identifying who the person is. (a non-identifying, non-restrictive clause) See Some or All and That vs Which

 

 

 

 

 

Whose-Clause

Clause Position

TV doctor
 

 

Modifying the Subject of the Main Clause

SUBJECT of MOD CLS MODIFIES SUBJECT OF MAIN CLAUSE

Below, a whose-clause modifies the subject noun of the main clause.  Whose+noun has taken the place of the subject pronoun in the modifying clause.

The man is a doctor. His show is entertaining.
The doctor is successful. His advice is amusing.

SUBJECT SUBJECT of MOD CLS  

The man

subject

whose show is entertaining 
subject–verb–adjective 

is a doctor.

The doctor

whose advice is amusing 

is successful on TV.  

OBJECT of MOD CLS MODIFIES SUBJECT OF MAIN CLAUSE

Below, a that-clause modifies the subject noun of the main clause.  That has taken the place of the object pronoun in the modifying clause.

The man is a doctor. We watch his show.
The doctor is successful. We value his advice .

SUBJECT SUBJECT of MOD CLS  

The man

subject

whose show we watch 
object–subject–verb  

is a doctor.

The doctor

whose advice we value 

is successful on TV.  

 

complement – a word, phrase or clause which is necessary in a sentence to complete its meaning
verb + complement – elements required to complete the meaning of the clause

 

 

 

Modifying the Object of the Main Clause

MODIFIES OBJECT OF MAIN CLAUSE

Below, a whose-clause modifies the object noun of the main clause.   whose is the subject pronoun in the modifying clause.

We watch the doctor. His TV show is funny.
Do you know the talk show host. His name is Turkish?

  OBJECT OBJECT of MOD CLS

We watch  

the doctor 

subject

whose TV show is funny 
subject–verb–adjective 

Do you know

the talk show host

whose name is Turkish?

MODIFIES OBJECT OF MAIN CLAUSE

Below, a that-clause modifies the object noun of the main clause.   That is also the object pronoun in the modifying clause.

We watch the doctor. You like his TV show.
The doctor is successful. We value his advice.

  OBJECT OBJECT of MOD CLS

We watch

the doctor 

subject

whose TV show you like. 
object–subject–verb 
 

Do you know

the talk show host

whose name i can't remember?

 

tiny (adj)– very small

tryout (v.) – test drive

Related pages: That vs. Which using commas  | Who / Whom using that for people

 

 

 

 

 

 

Whose-Clause

Punctuation

 

 

 

An identifying vs. Nonidentifying Clause

IDENTIFYING CLAUSE

no comma usedA clause that identifies the noun before it (tells you which person) is not set off with commas. No comma(s) is/are used.

You met  the woman  whose first name is Greek

The man whose TV show is popular is a doctor.

NONIDENTIFYING CLAUSE

use a commaA clause that adds extra, nonidentifying information is set off with comma(s).  See Commas

You met  Arianna,  whose first name is Greek

Dr. Oz, whose TV show is popular, is a doctor.

 

An identifying clause  (restrictive clause) adds information or narrows the noun to a specific one, group or lot.  The clause helps by telling us which one. No commas are used.  It is also called restrictive, essential , or necessary clause. See That vs. Which   Some or All.

A nonidentifying clause (non-restrictive clause) adds extra information about a noun already identified by other means, for example, by name, by shared knowledge or context. The clause, a comment, is set off with commas (before and, if necessary, after the clause). It is also called nonrestrictive, nonessential,  or unnecessary clause. See Commas – comments.

 

 

 

 

 

Common Mistakes

Errors and Solutionsballoon runner

 

 

 

ERROR SOLUTION

*The runner who his balloons popped ran to the finish line naked! 
 

The runner whose balloons popped   ran to the finish line naked!

*The woman whose husband we chatted with him lives next door.

The woman whose husband we chatted with [him]   lives next door.

*The woman who her husband is from Uruguay is going to be the CEO of the company.
 

The woman whose husband is from Uruguay is going to be the CEO of the company.  (Change who her to whose.)

*Yellow highlighted words are examples of incorrect usage.
Solution - lightbulb  Pop-Q " Balloons"

 

 

 

 

Practice 1

Identifying TV Show Characters

Funny guy and dog
 

 

Read Context (without clauses)

I like the television program about a funny guy. His dog always stares at him. The man has a great outlook on life. His family encourages him.

One brother is very picky. His tastes are eccentric. The other brother is very practical. He is more easy-going.

The older man is the father of the brothers. His complaints are non-stop. The young woman is the physical therapist of the father. Her accent is from Manchester, England.

The red-haired woman is an assistant. She is a bit of an "air head".   

The character whose face is never seen is the wife of the picky brother.  The main character's ex-wife is very funny. She thinks but cannot feel.

The real character is the dog. His performance is the funniest.

accent (n.) – particular way of pronouncing words (dialectal)

air head (expression) – not too smart

character (n.) – a role in the show, a person acting as a person in the show

real character (expression) – an unusual or funny person He's a real character.

complaint (n.) – discontent;saying something is wrong or painful

easy-going (adj.) – has a more relaxed way of thinking

eccentric (adj.) – unusual, odd

encourage (v.) – to give someone the courage or confidence to do something

outlook (n.) – general attitude to life and the world

picky (adj.) – choosy, selective (difficult!)

robotic (adj.) – like a robot (able to reason–only)

stare (v.) – look at or watch causing the subject to become uncomfortable

 tastes (n.) – preferences

 

 

 

Decide whether to add a who-clause or a whose-clause.

  1. Select the response from the list that best completes the sentence. 
  2. Compare your response to the feedback by clicking the "check" or the "check 1-10" button at the bottom.
1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

8.

9.

10.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Practice 2

Kinship Names

Kinship chart
 

 

 

Read for Errors

My mother's brother's daughter just gave birth to a baby.  What should I call this relative?

A sibling is a person whose a brother or sister.

Two people are called siblings whose mother and father are the same.

A person whose mother is also yours is called your sibling.

A person who his mother is your aunt is called cousin.

People are called cousins whose grandparents are the same.

People who are not siblings but who their great grandparents are the same are second cousins.

The term once removed is used for people whose generation differs by one.  (The grandparent of one is the great-grandparent of the other.)

Then my mother's brother's daughter whose got a new baby is my cousin.

The baby whose mother is my cousin is my cousin once removed.

The person is the smallest person in the family whose kinship name is the longest.

 

 

 

 

 

Decided whether the use and placement of the whose-clause is correct or incorrect.  (Don't worry about the kinship terms!)

  1. Select the response correct or incorrect
  2. Compare your response to the feedback by clicking the "check 11-20" button at the bottom, or click the "check" button as you go.

 

11.
A sibling is a person whose a brother or sister.

   

12.
Two people are called siblings whose mother and father are the same.

   

13.
A person whose mother is also yours is called your sibling.

   

14.
A person who his mother is your aunt is called cousin.

   

15.
People are called cousins whose grandparents are the same.

   

16.
People who are not siblings but who their great grandparents are the same are second cousins.

   

17.
The term once removed is used for people whose generation differs by one.

   

18.
Then my mother's brother's daughter whose got a new baby is my cousin.

   

19.
The baby whose mother is my cousin is my cousin once removed.

   

20.
The person is the smallest person in the family whose kinship name is the longest.

   

 

 

 

Wikipedia contributors. "Cousin." Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, 18 Feb. 2013. Web. 18 Feb. 2013.  URL

 

 

 

 

Practice 3

Celebrity Pros and ConsA cadid celebrity photo

 

Read for Errors

A person whose famous has to manage both the good and the bad sides of celebrity.  On the good side, people are excited to meet a celebrity in the news whose face is easily recognized from television or movies. Such a person attracts the curiosity of other people who they think their lives seem less exciting.

However, a person whose picture is in the news can't hide easily. If he's walking down the street, everyone whose sees him can walk right up to him and ask for an autograph. Also, the public expects to meet a celebrity whose is a model for others. 

Celebrity is even more difficult for a woman.  A female celebrity in the news whose disheveled picture appears becomes a target for gossip.  She cannot leave her house without being "picture perfect". Consequently, when we see celebrities whose heads are covered and whose eyes are hidden behind sunglasses, we can understand why they do so.

Managing the good and the bad is essential for a celebrity who his career depends on it. And though we may feel a little jealous of celebrity privileges, anyone whose experienced fame will tell you it has its pros and cons.

celebrity (n.) — (1) a famous, well-known person; (2) fame, renown 

curiosity (n.) — the desire to learn or know about something

disheveled (adj.) — poorly groomed, badly dressed; looking messy; unkempt

gossip (n.) — when people say unkind or unfavorable things that are untruthful

jealous (adj.) — feeling resentment against someone because of that person's success, or advantages

privileges (n.) — special rights, benefits

recognized (adj.) — identified

right (adv.) — directly

target (n.) — focus of gossip

spotlight (n.) — the light of the social or political stage

 

 

 

Edit and join the clauses to remove wordiness from the paragraph.

  1. Edit the sentence(s) in the text box.
  2. Compare your response to the feedback by clicking the "check 21-30" button at the bottom, or click the "check" button as you go.

 

21.
A person whose famous has to manage both the good and the bad sides of celebrity. 


22.
On the good side, people are excited to meet a celebrity in the news whose face is easily recognized from television or movies.


23.
Such a person attracts the curiosity of other people who they think their lives may seem less exciting.


24.
However, a person whose picture is in the news can't hide easily.


25.
 If he's walking down the street, everyone whose sees him can walk right up to him and ask for an autograph.


26.
Also, the public expects to meet a celebrity whose is a model for others.


27.
Celebrity is even more difficult for a woman.  A female celebrity in the news whose disheveled picture appears becomes a target for gossip. 


28.
Consequently, when we see celebrities whose heads are covered and whose eyes are hidden behind sunglasses, we can understand why they do so.


29.
Managing the good and the bad is essential for a celebrity who his career depends on it.


30.
And though we may feel a little jealous of celebrity privileges, anyone whose experienced fame will tell you it has its pros and cons.