Noun Identification Practice

Recognize six ways that nouns become "known"

 

 

 

Ways a noun can be identified (known)

A  — UNIDENTIFIED / FIRST MENTION

A is used the first time we mention a noun.

FIRST MENTION

This is a puzzle piece.

FIRST MENTION

This is a puzzle piece.

FIRST MENTION

This is a puzzle

FIRST MENTION

A piece goes in the upper right corner.

FIRST MENTION

Hand me a piece.   (any piece)

 

FIRST MENTION

"Hand me a piece."

"There's only one left."

THE  — IDENTIFIED / SECOND MENTION

The is used when both the speaker and listener know "which one".  The following are examples of ways in which a noun becomes identified in the context.

SECOND MENTION

The piece fits into a puzzle.

ALREADY MENTIOND BY ANOTHER NAME

The parts are rather small.  (a piece = a part)

EXPECTED PART OF AN ALREADY MENTIONED ITEM

The pieces are inside the puzzle box. 

IDENTIFYING PHRASE OR CLAUSE

The piece with two flat edges goes in the corner.

The piece that I am holding is a corner piece.

BOTH SEE OR KNOW WHICH ONE

Hand me the piece.  (We both know / see which one.)

UNIQUENESS

Hand me the last piece (There is no other one like it.)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Practice 1

Selling cookies door-to-door

selling cookies at the door
 

 

Read for Errors

A girl rang my door bell this afternoon. Girl introduced herself and her sister.  Her sister was pulling a red wagon. Red wagon held box. The box had an assortment of cookies. Assortment included peanut butter, chocolate and lemon cookies.  I told her I would buy a box of assorted cookies.

I asked her price of box. She told me five dollars.  I told her it was high price for little box of cookies. She told me money was for Girl Scouts. So I agreed to pay high price for little box of assorted cookies Little girls left, and I opened box to eat cookies.

assorted (adj.) — mixed, various, different types

assortment (n.) — having one of each kind; variation, mixture

 

 

 

 

Correct or Incorrect?

  1. Select the option that best describes the sentence.
  2. Compare your response to the feedback by clicking the "check" button.
1.
A girl rang my door bell this afternoon. Girl introduced herself and her sister.
   

2.
wagonHer sister was pulling a red wagon. Red wagon held box.
   

3.
The box had an assortment of cookies. 
   

4.
Assortment included peanut butter, chocolate and lemon cookies.cookie
   

5.
I told her I would buy a box of assorted cookies.
   

6.
I asked her price of box. She told me five dollars. 
   

7.
I told her it was high price for little box of cookies.
   

8.
She told me money was for Girl Scouts.
   

9.
So I agreed to pay high price for little box of assorted cookies.
   

10.
Little girls left, and I opened the box to eat cookies.
   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Practice 2

Cultural Knowledge -  Kids Born After 1994

College Grad
 

 

Determine whether the noun is identified and should include "the".

  1. Select the response from the list that best completes the sentence. 
  2. Compare your response to the feedback by clicking the "check" button.

 

11.


class of 20116 – a graduating class that begins study in 20112

12.

13.

14.

15.

16.

17.

18.

19.

20.

 

"2016 List. " The Mindset List. Beloit College.  2012 < http://www.beloit.edu/mindset/2016/> Nov 2012.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Practice 3

Mouse CookieOne Thing Leads to Another

 

 

 

Read for Errors

If you give mouse cookie, he’ll probably ask for glass of milk. Then, he will probably need straw for milk. His whiskers will be dirty, so he will ask for napkin.  Napkin will be dirty, so he’ll need to throw it away. He’ll see that garbage is full, so he’ll offer to take it out. His hands will be dirty, so he’ll want to wash them in sink.

straw  He’ll probably ask for towel. Towel will remind him of his blanket and his bed. Then, he’ll ask for blanket to take nap.  While he takes nap, you'll probably want to remove mouse from your house. Otherwise, he will ask for cookie all over again.

whiskers (n.) – coarse long hair around the mouth of a mouse

Adapted from

Numeroff, Laura Joffe., and Felicia Bond. If You Give a Mouse a Cookie. New York: Harper & Row, 1985. Print.

 

 

 

 

Edit for Errors

  1. Edit the sentence(s) in the text box.
  2. Compare your response to the feedback by clicking the "check" button.  Corrections are marked with asterisks: *a* or *the*.

 

21.
If you give mouse cookie, he’ll probably ask for glass of milk.


22.
Then, he will probably need straw for milk.


23.
His whiskers will be dirty, so he will ask for napkin.  Napkin will be dirty, so he’ll need to throw it away.


24.
He’ll see that garbage is full, so he’ll offer to take it out. His hands will be dirty, so he’ll want to wash them in sink.


25.
He’ll probably ask for towelTowel will remind him of his blanket and his bed.


26.
Then, he’ll ask for blanket to take nap.


27.
While he takes nap, you'll probably want to remove mouse from your house.


28.
Otherwise, he will ask for cookie all over again.